Log In

OLD FASHIONED PANCAKES

March 11, 2012 11:04 am 0 comments

Pancakes are sweet, thin, and flat, round shaped cakes prepared from a batter and cooked on a hot griddle or frying pan. Old fashioned pancakes are traditionally one of the very old beginnings of bread and pastry. People of all nationalities have made pancakes from time immemorial.

Pancakes are cooked in various variations in different parts of the nation. Today pancakes are enjoyed for breakfast, lunch, dinner and even for dessert. In American or Canadian cuisines, the pancakes sometimes are even called as hotcakes, griddlecakes or flipjacks. The batter of making the pancakes contains a raising agent such as baking powder, eggs, flour, milk or buttermilk to create a thick batter. Sometimes sugar and spices such as cinnamon, vanilla and nutmeg are also added.

Pancakes have a nice soft texture and generally served topped with maple syrup, honey, peanut butter or powdered sugar and whipped cream. This relatively gives moistness to the pancakes and when eaten just melts into your mouth. Typically, pancakes are cooked one side on a griddle and flipped partway through to cook the other side. Depending on the region, pancakes may be served at any time of day, with a variety of toppings or fillings including jam, chocolate chips, fruit, syrup or meat.

The tradition of serving the good old fashioned pancakes is to pile up a couple of pancakes one on the top of the other and pour syrup over them. You can pour any kind of syrup of your choice. To enjoy your super stack of pancakes, give a nice touch of heat by placing them in the microwave so that, you get hot syrup and hot pancakes. This makes the pancakes soft and just mouth melting.

Kids love to sprinkle fruits like blueberries, strawberries or chocolate chips in between the layers of the pancakes which helps in melting the chips nicely. Wow! The thought is just lip licking. The pancakes can be made either sweet or savory by adding different ingredients in your batter.

Indian pancakes are generally savory pancakes. They are several ways of making a pancake in India and are known by different names such as Dosa, Appam, Neer dosa and Uttapam. They can be made either sweet or salty and are of different thicknesses in different places. They are prepared by fermenting rice batter and split skinned urad bean (black lentil) blended with water. Punjabis make a sweet pancake called meetha pooda which is a common breakfast and is eaten with pickles and chutney. In Assam, pithas are a type of pancakes served on occasions such as Bihu and in most parts of India, Malpua is an excellent and delicious sweet pancake prepared during festivals.

French crêpes, popular in France, Belgium, Switzerland, Canada, Portugal and Brazil (where they may be called panquecas or crepes) are made from flour, milk, and eggs. They are thin pancakes and are usually served with a large amount of sweet or savory filling, ranging from fruit or ice cream, to seafood (in Brazil, most usually ground meat). In Francophone Europe, crêpes are often sold in special stands, along with Nutella for topping. They have become very popular in many East Asian countries, including Japan, South Korea, The Philippines, Thailand and China, where they are sold in numerous crêpe stands and kiosks. They are often served with whipped cream and fruits, or non-sweet spreads such as various vegetables.

This recipe makes one fine stack of pancakes. Not too thick, not too thin, tender, light, buttery, and delicious. To prepare Old Fashioned Pancakes, in a bowl mix in all the seven ingredients and combine together to form a nice batter.

Mix together 1 ½ cups all-purpose flour, 3 ½ teaspoons baking powder, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 tablespoon white sugar, 1 egg and 1 ¼ cup milk in a large mixing bowl. Mix well until all ingredients are blended. Continue to mix until there are no lumps in the batter. The thicker the batter, the thicker the pancakes will be.

In a hot frying pan or tawa, melt about 1 teaspoon butter. Drop a 1/4 cup scoop of batter onto the pan. You might need to spread it around just a bit if the batter is extra thick.  You should hear a slight sizzle when you pour the batter; if it sizzles loudly, or worse, big bubbles form as you pour, the heat is way too high. Turn it down. The raising agent causes bubbles to rise to the uncooked side, before the pancake is flipped.

Separate the pancakes with a spatula once they begin to bubble and dry at the top, and carefully flip them over. Allow the other side to cook for two to three minutes.

Once both sides of pancakes are brown, remove from the frying pan and butter. Eat with syrup and enjoy.

A few tips with your pancakes – add a knob of melted butter to the mix just before cooking and only cook them in a frying pan with butter. Smear just enough butter on the pan that it’s not too greasy.  Add a little knob of butter to the frying pan after each pancake.

If possible, let the batter rest for a few minutes to allow the baking soda and baking powder to perform their magic. This will make for airier pancakes.

Enjoy Cooking!

Leave a Reply


join me
Social Media
Add Me in Facebook Subscribe In Youtube Connect me with your friends and family Follow Us On Twitter